The need for practic-tech

Some interesting facts

ac1

The programs offered by technical colleges and trade schools are often inconsistent with employers' needs

which makes it difficult for graduates to integrate into the
job market and adversely affects their lifelong learning
options (also resulting in the underrepresentation of
women and ultra-Orthodox Jews).
ac2

The fourth industrial revolution is transforming the job market before our very eyes

but the institutions of higher learning are not keeping up with
the pace of change. That is especially true when it comes
to equipping students with skills required in
an interdisciplinary world.
ac3

Government resources earmarked for this purpose are limited

Government resources earmarked for this purpose are limited
ac4

There is a lack of supportive public policy

pertaining to regulation, pedagogy and
accreditation that affects future studies.
ac5

Prospective employees prefer
academic education over technical
education

due to the unappealing image of technical education and a lack of awareness that in many jobs the return on a practical engineering degree is identical to the return on an academic degree.
ac6

There is a high demand for
workers in these fields

but the supply does not meet the demand
and productivity is low.
ac7

First-rate technical education and
vocational training are an asset

that fosters social mobility and for that reason investing
in them benefits all stakeholders, including students,
employers and the economy as a whole.
ac8

Employers are not particularly
motivated

to get actively involved in streamlining vocational
training and professional development.

Some interesting facts

ac1

The programs offered by technical colleges and trade schools are often inconsistent with employers' needs

which makes it difficult for graduates to integrate into the job market and adversely affects their lifelong learning options (also resulting in the underrepresentation of women and ultra-Orthodox Jews).
ac2

The fourth industrial revolution is transforming the job market before our very eyes

but the institutions of higher learning are not keeping up with the pace of change. That is especially true when it comes to equipping students with skills required in an interdisciplinary world.
ac3

Government resources earmarked for this purpose are limited

Government resources earmarked for this purpose are limited
ac4

There is a lack of supportive public policy

pertaining to regulation, pedagogy and accreditation that affects future studies.
ac5

Prospective employees prefer academic education over technical education

due to the unappealing image of technical education and a lack of awareness that in many jobs the return on a practical engineering degree is identical to the return on an academic degree.
ac6

There is a high demand for workers in these fields

but the supply does not meet the demand and productivity is low.
ac7

First-rate technical education and vocational training are an asset

that fosters social mobility and for that reason investing in them benefits all stakeholders, including students, employers and the economy as a whole.
ac8

Employers are not particularly motivated

to get actively involved in streamlining vocational training and professional development.

Why is There a Need for Practic-Tech (PT)?

In a job market undergoing a transformation, which is expected to change even more under the fourth industrial revolution, there is a shortage of first-rate workers in PT – namely, applied technology vocations, and in particular machining, electrical wiring, and construction, that rely on technical knowledge and practical skills. Technical education for young adults over the age of 18, including vocational training and practical engineering degree programs, has not kept up with the changes taking place in the world of employment.
A problem exists in the higher education system which is supposed to produce PT workers. The components of that problem: the unappealing image associated with PT professions, curriculam that are not in step with the 21st century and employer's requirements, a lack of coordinated public policy, and little support and involvement on the part of employers, social organizations and philanthropy. Graduates of technical colleges and trade schools lack knowledge and skills that are relevant to today's job market and, consequently, industry, commerce and services are adversely affected.
The training and learning methodologies used at the technical colleges and trade schools therefore need to be revised and employers have to be more involved. The image of PT professions in Israel also needs to be upgraded. These steps will lead to improved knowledge and skills among technical college and trade school graduates and enable them to integrate into jobs that are consistent with their skills and relevant to their education.
Nonetheless, even if technical college and trade school students in Israel graduate with tools and skills that facilitate their quick and effective integration into the job market, the expected pace of the changes in the world of employment, in general, and in PT fields, in particular, is likely at some point to create a new gap between their skills and the market's requirements. For that reason, the Beyachad Foundation wishes to build and implement modular models in the technical education programs – ones that will lay the foundation for incorporating lifelong learning methodologies in Israel's economy, ensure professional development, and update workers' skills in a way that secures their relevant and productive employment in the field over time.